Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutic Oncology

Editorial Board (JCRTO)

Mathew Casimiro
Mathew Casimiro
Assistant Professor
Thomas Jefferson University
United States
Biography
Dr. Casimiro is an Assistant Professor at Thomas Jefferson University. For the last 10 years he has been working on breast cancer from a novel perspective. He has experience in mouse model systems of human disease and extensive molecular biology experience. He was the first to identify a novel mechanism involving the interaction of the cell cycle and metabolism. Dr. Casimiro will design and execute the experiments related to the aims and assist in writing and submiting the manuscripts.
Publications
Assistant Professor
Thomas Jefferson University
United States
Research Interest
LQT and KCNQ1, Cyclin D1 - noncanonical functions in breast cancer, Cyclin D1 and prostate cancer, Cancer cell metabolism.
Luca Gattinoni (NIH/NCI)
Luca Gattinoni (NIH/NCI)
Investigator
Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute
United States
Tel. 301-451-6914
Biography
Dr. Gattinoni received his M.D. from the Universita' degli Studi of Milan, Italy. Following the completion of his residency in medical oncology at the Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan, he joined the NCI in 2003 as a Visiting Fellow and became a Staff Scientist in 2008. In 2013, Dr. Gattinoni was appointed as an Earl Stadtman Tenure-Track Investigator at the Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch. His research interest is in T-cell-based immunotherapies with an emphasis on T-cell differentiation and transcriptional regulation of T-cell self-renewal and memory formation.
Publications
Investigator
Center for Cancer Research
National Cancer Institute
United States
Tel. 301-451-6914
Research Interest
T-cell-based immunotherapies with an emphasis on T-cell differentiation and transcriptional regulation of T-cell self-renewal and memory formation
James M. Phang (NIH/NCI)
James M. Phang (NIH/NCI)
Head, Metabolism & Cancer Susceptibility Section
Center for Cancer Research
United States
Tel: (301)-846-5367
Biography
Dr. James Phang received his M.D. from Loma Linda University School of Medicine and his clinical training in internal medicine from Stanford Medical Center. He was a clinical associate with the NCI's Metabolism Branch. After additional training in biochemistry and molecular biology with the Laboratory of Chemical Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Dr. Phang was appointed a senior investigator in the Metabolism Branch, NCI, and later became chief of the Endocrinology Section. From 1989 to 1998, he served as chief of the Laboratory of Nutritional and Molecular Regulation, and in 1998, he formed the Metabolism and Cancer Susceptibility Section in the Basic Research Laboratory. The Section joined the Laboratory of Comparative Carcinogenesis in 2003.
Publications
Head, Metabolism & Cancer Susceptibility Section
Center for Cancer Research
United States
Tel: (301)-846-5367
Research Interest
Metabolic Mechanisms for Modulating the Cancer Susceptible Phenotype, The Apc Genotype in Colorectal Carcinogenesis and Modulation of the Phenotype by Nitric Oxide, Proline and Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate in Cell Regulation, Prolidase renders proline (hydroxyproline) from extracellular matrix degradation
Wafik El-Deiry
Wafik El-Deiry
Professor
Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute
United States
Tel: (610)-800-2443
Biography
Dr. Wafik El-Deiry, MD, PhD, FACP is the Rose Dunlap Professor of Medicine and Chief of the Hematology/Oncology Division at the Penn State University Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Penn State College of Medicine, Associate Director for Translational Research and Program Leader of Experimental Therapeutics at the Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute. Dr. El-Deiry is also one of 40 active American Cancer Society Research Professors. Dr. El-Deiry earned his MD and PhD degrees from the University of Miami and completed internal medicine residency at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and then completed oncology fellowship training at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center in Baltimore. He discovered p21(WAF1) as a p53 target gene, universal cell cycle inhibitor and tumor suppressor gene that for the first time explained the mammalian cell stress response. This is the most highly cited original work published in the prestigious journal Cell over the last 20 years. Dr. El-Deiry joined the faculty at the University Of Pennsylvania School Of Medicine as Assistant Professor of Medicine and Genetics in 1994, Associate Professor with tenure in 1999 and rose to full Professor of Medicine, Pharmacology and Genetics with tenure by 2005. He was an Investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute from 1995-2004. He served as co-Program Leader of the Radiobiology & Imaging Program at the Abramson Cancer Center and as Associate Director for Physician-Scientist Training in Hematology/Oncology at the University of Pennsylvania. He made several discoveries in the field of cell death and tumor suppressor genes including discovery of TRAIL death receptor DR5 as a target of the p53 tumor suppressor. Dr. El-Deiry’s laboratory has also developed a functional small molecule discovery screening and in vivo validation/efficacy testing process for accelerating the identification and development of molecularly-targeted anti-cancer therapeutic agents. He has over 300 peer reviewed publications. He has been very active in serving on journal editorial boards including as Associate Editor for the Journal of Clinical Investigation from 2007-2010 and as the Editor-in-Chief of Cancer Biology and Therapy from 2001 to the present. Dr. El-Deiry is very active in the NIH review system, lectures widely throughout the world and was named as a highly cited researcher by Thompson ISI in the field of molecular biology and genetics in 2005 and as one of America's Top Oncologists by the Consumer Research Council of America in 2008 and 2009. He is a member of the Faculty of 1000 in Cell Growth and Division. He is a member of several national physician honor societies including the Interurban Clinical Club, the American Society of Clinical Investigation and the American Association of Physicians. He has organized several international meetings and has won several awards including the 2010 international Kuwait Prize in Applied Sciences for "Cancer Diseases." He is a practicing physician-scientist who specializes in colorectal cancer treatment.
Publications
Professor
Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute
United States
Tel: (610)-800-2443
Research Interest
Drug resistance in cancer, cell death, tumor suppressor genes, cell cycle, translational research, cancer stem cells, tumor microenvironment, hypoxia, p53, TRAIL, c-Myc, BRCA1, molecular imaging, drug discovery
Guido Kroemer
Guido Kroemer
Research Director
French Medical Research Council
Institut Gustave Roussy
France
Tel: +33-1- 42 11 60 46
Biography
Guido Kroemer is currently a Research Director at the French Medical Research Council (INSERM), and the Director of the Research Unit "Apoptosis, Cancer and Immunity" at the Institut Gustave Roussy located in Villejuif, near to Paris, France. Prior to joining the INSERM (1993), Dr. Kroemer was Senior Scientist of the European Community at the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), at the National Center of Molecular Biology (1990-1992) and at the National Center of Biotechnology (1993). Dr. Kroemer did his post-doctoral training in the College de France, Nogent-sur-Marne (1988-1989) and at the University of Innsbruck, Austria, after receiving his Ph.D/M.D. degree at the same University in 1985. He also holds a Ph.D. degree in Biology (Autonomous University of Madrid, 1992). Guido Kroemer's team discovered in 1994 that mitochondrial membrane permeabilization is a critical step in programmed cell death. His current research focuses on pathogenic derangements of programmed cell death, the pathophysiology of autophagy, the molecular perturbations of cancer cell apoptosis, the pharmacological induction of apoptosis and the role of immunogenic cell death in anticancer therapy. Guido Kroemer is currently the most cited scientist worldwide in the field of cell death . He is member of EMBO, German Academy of Sciences (Leopoldina), Academia Europaea, European Academy of Sciences (EAS), and European Academy of Sciences and Arts (EASA). He is the President elect of the European Cell Death Organization (ECDO) and the Founding Director of the European Research Institute for Integrated Cellular Pathology (ERI-ICP). Kroemer received the 2006 Descartes Prize, the highest scientific distinction of the European Union, for his fundamental discoveries in the field of programmed cell death (apoptosis). He also received one of the Grands Prix from the French Academy of Sciences in 2007, the Carus Medal 2008 from the German Academy of Sciences, and the Dautrebande Prize 2009 from the Belgian Royal Academy of Medicine.
Publications
Research Director
French Medical Research Council
Institut Gustave Roussy
France
Tel: +33-1- 42 11 60 46
Research Interest
Apoptosis, cancer research, cell biology, molecular biology, immunology
Jing Huang (NIH/NCI)
Jing Huang (NIH/NCI)
Principal Investigator
Cancer and Stem Cell Epigenetics
National Cancer Institute
United States
Tel: (301)-496-2202
Biography
Dr. Huang received his BS in Biochemistry from Peking University. He studied estrogen receptor signaling with Drs. Robert Bambara and Mesut Muyan at the University of Rochester (NY) and received his PhD in 2004. After his postdoctoral training in cancer epigenetics with Dr. Shelley Berger at the Wistar Institute, he joined the Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics as a tenure-track Principal Investigator in October, 2008. Dr. Huang won a NCI Director's Innovation Award with Dr. Jianxin Shi (DCEG) in 2011.
Publications
Principal Investigator
Cancer and Stem Cell Epigenetics
National Cancer Institute
United States
Tel: (301)-496-2202
Research Interest
Stem cell differentiation, cancer stem cells, and differentiation
Stefan Wiemann
Stefan Wiemann
Professor and Head
Division Molecular Genome Analysis
German Cancer Research Center
Germany
Biography
Stefan Wiemann earned his PhD from the University of Kaiserslautern and the German Cancer Research Center Heidelberg on the cloning of isoforms of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. He was visiting scientist at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory from 1992-1995, where he contributed to the genome sequencing of the first eukaryote (S.cerevisiae) as well as to the development of sequencing technologies. He then joined the DKFZ to set up a pipeline for the systematic analysis of human genes. Since 2008 he has been head of the division Molecular Genome Analysis and as of 2010 also of the Genomics and Proteomics Core Facility of the DKFZ. He has led large research networks in national DHGP and NGFN funding programs and is partner in international consortia. He coordinated the German cDNA Consortium, the largest initiative for cDNA generation and sequencing in Europe. Building on these cDNA resources, functional genomic projects were established aimed to analyze the localization and activities of encoded proteins. In the recent years, his focus has shifted to the investigation of molecular events during breast cancer development and progression, and on the mechanistic impact proteins and miRNAs have in these processes. Major emphasis of his lab is on the regulation of cellular signaling pathways and networks in tumor development, drug resistance, and metastasis. The Genomics and Proteomics Core Facility operates one of the largest next generation sequencing units in Europe, having a focus on genome, exome and RNA sequencing of clinical specimen. Along these lines, Stefan Wiemann is partner in an interdisciplinary consortium that aims to develop guidelines for dealing with the ethical and legal implications NGS imposes on genetic testing of individuals.
Publications
Professor and Head
Division Molecular Genome Analysis
German Cancer Research Center
Germany
Research Interest
Breast cancer, signaling networks, mechanisms of drug resistance and metastasis, tumor-microenvironment interactions, miRNAs, genomics and proteomics technologies, ethics of genome-wide genetic testing
David J. Riese II
David J. Riese II
Gilliland and Franklin Professor
Harrison School of Pharmacy
Auburn University
Tel: (334)-844-8358
Biography
Dr. David Riese received a PhD in Genetics from Yale University, where he investigated the oncogenic activities of papillomavirus genes under the tutelage of Dr. Daniel DiMaio and demonstrated that the PDGF receptor signaling pathway is required for transformation of fibroblasts by the Bovine Papillomavirus E5 protein. He subsequently pursued postdoctoral training in Pathology at Yale University, where he studied interactions of EGF family peptide growth factors with ErbB family receptor tyrosine kinases under the tutelage of Dr. David F. Stern. He then joined the faculty at Purdue University, where he was affiliated with the College of Pharmacy and the NCI-designated Center for Cancer Research. Since 2010 he has been the Gilliland and Franklin Professor of Pharmacal Sciences at the Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy, where he also holds the position of Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Programs. Dr. Riese's laboratory continues to study signaling by EGF family hormones and ErbB family receptors, with a focus on the EGFR/ErbB1 and ErbB4/HER4 receptor tyrosine kinases and their growth factor ligands.
Publications
Gilliland and Franklin Professor
Harrison School of Pharmacy
Auburn University
Tel: (334)-844-8358
Research Interest
ERBB4 and Epithelial Tumors, EGF Family Hormones, EGFR Mutants and Human Malignancies
Julian J. Lum
Julian J. Lum
Scientist
BC Cancer Agency
University of Victoria
Canada
Tel: (250)-519-5718
Biography
Dr. Lum has PhD from the University of Ottawa in Microbiology and Immunology where he studied the regulation of death receptor-mediated apoptosis of CD4 T cells. His work focused on TNF-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) during HIV infection. In 2003, Dr. Lum pursued post-doctoral training with Craig B. Thompson at the University of Pennsylvania where they studied how metabolic stress regulates autophagy and consequentially T cell function. Dr. Lum was recruited to the BC Cancer Agency in 2008 where he is studying the interplay between the tumor microenvironment and the immune system. He is studying how autophagy is regulated and whether metabolic conditions can skew T cell differentiation, function and memory T cell generation. Finally, his laboratory is interested in understanding how radiation therapy impacts the anti-tumor response in prostate and ovarian cancer. Dr. Lum is a CIHR New Investigator and holds grants from CIHR, CRS, DoD, Genome BC, and local cancer charities and organizations. Keywords: Autophagy, T cell immunotherapy, radiation treatment, T cell metabolism, angiogenesis, hypoxia, tumor metabolism.
Publications
Scientist
BC Cancer Agency
University of Victoria
Canada
Tel: (250)-519-5718
Research Interest
Cancer Metabolism, Tumor Immunology, Autophagy, Memory T cells
Bing Zhu
Bing Zhu
Assistant Professor
Mitchell Cancer Institute
Drug Discovery Research Center
United States
Tel: 251-445-8416
Biography
Dr. Zhu has worked in the areas of carcinogenesis and cancer chemoprevention since 1996. His major research expertise is in the field of cyclic nucleotide signaling and phosphodiesterase isozymes that control tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. Dr. Zhu received a Ph.D. in pharmacology from Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing, China in 1996. Dr. Zhu held a position as Assistant Professor for anti-tumor drug studies in Beijing Medical University, Chinese National Key Laboratory from 1996-1997. Dr. Zhu joined the University of South Alabama as a postdoctoral fellow from 1997-2002 and served as an independent investigator from 2002-2005. Dr. Zhu became a faculty member and a principal investigator in the Department of Pharmacology and Center for Lung Biology of University of South Alabama in 2005. Dr. Zhu held an Assistant Professor position from 2008-2011 and led several research projects in studies of the pharmacology and cell biology of tumor and endothelial cell models, which were supported by intramural and extramural funding from NIH and AHA resources. In November 2011, Dr. Zhu joined the Drug Discovery Research Center at the Mitchell Cancer Institute. Dr. Zhu’s studies are focused on understanding the basis of cell signaling transduction and compartmentalization for the cancer biology, chemotherapy and chemoprevention and the development of novel drugs with the potential for improved safety and efficacy in clinical application. Dr. Zhu has a special experience in tumorigenesis, chemoprevention, cancer biology, cyclic nucleotides and phosphodiesterase, especially in lung cancer area and related normal lung biology.
Publications
Assistant Professor
Mitchell Cancer Institute
Drug Discovery Research Center
United States
Tel: 251-445-8416
Research Interest
Cancer chemoprevention and anti-cancer drug development; Phosphodiesterases and cAMP/cGMP signaling in cancer biology; Intracellular signaling compartmentalization and anti-cancer therapy; Angiogenesis of cancer cells and normal tissues.

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