Journal of Chemical and Process Engineering
Editorial Article

Nano-Chemical Engineering and Nano-Processes in Manufacturing Multifunctional Nanocomposites

Daowei Ding
AFFILIATIONS
Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 USA
, Huige Wei
AFFILIATIONS
Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 USA
, Yiran Wang
AFFILIATIONS
Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 USA
, Jiang Guo
AFFILIATIONS
Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 USA
, Xi Zhang
AFFILIATIONS
Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 USA
, Xingru Yan
AFFILIATIONS
Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 USA
, Dawei Jiang
AFFILIATIONS
Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 USA
, Bin Qiu
AFFILIATIONS
Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 USA
, Qingliang He
AFFILIATIONS
Engineered Multifunctional Composites LLC, Beaumont, TX 77713 USA
, Suying Wei*
AFFILIATIONS
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 USA
Corresponding author (Address):
Suying Wei, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 USA; E-mail: suying.wei@lamar.edu
Zhanhu Guo*
AFFILIATIONS
Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 USA
Corresponding author (Address):
Zhanhu Guo, Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F. Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710 USA; E-mail: zhanhu.guo@lamar.edu
Received Date: October 28, 2014 Accepted Date: December 08, 2014 Published Date: December 10, 2014

Citation: Daowei Ding, et al. (2014) Nano-Chemical Engineering and Nano-Processes in Manufacturing Multifunctional Nanocomposite. J Chem Proc Engg 1: 1-3

Abstract

Nano-Chemical engineering and nano-processes are critical in manufacturing multifunctional nanocomposites which are used for wide applications. Innovations made in nano-chemical engineering and nano-processes have enhanced performances of existing nanocomposites and developed new types of nanocomposites. On the other hand, the nano-chemical engineering and nano-processes can be affected by the design of the nanocomposites.

Key words: Nano-chemical engineering; Nano-process; Nanocomposites

Nano-Chemical engineering and nano-processes essentially deal with the technology of large-scale chemical production and the manufacturing of products through chemical processes employing nanotechnology [1,2]. Nano-Chemical engineering and nano-processes play a key role in fabricating multifunctional nanocomposites which are defined as "two or more materials with different properties remain separate and distinct on a macroscopic level within one unity and with any dimension in any phase less than 100 nm"[3-53-5]. The produced nanocomposites are essential for technological progress and have demonstrated versatile applications ranging from environmental remediation, energy storage, electromagnetic (EM) absorption, sensing and actuation, transportation and safety, defense system, information industry, to novel catalysts, etc., Figure 1 . [3-14]

The nano-chemical engineering and nano-processes to manufacture nanocomposites differ depending on the types as well as the applications of the nanocomposites. For example, electrochemical polymerization techniques are usually utilized to obtain conductive polymer nano thin films for electrochromic devices [15,16] or anticorrosion coatings to protect metal substrates,[17] whereas chemical oxidative polymerization techniques are preferred to achieve power-form nanocomposites for electrochemical energy storage [18,19] or giant magnetoresistance sensor applications.[20]

Progresses made in nano-chemical and nano-process often bring innovative products or improved performances which can meet ever increasing requirements of materials and broaden their applications. A typical example has been witnessed in the electrospinning technique for fabricating polymer nanofibers. Only single-structured nanofibers can be obtained using conventional electrospinning setup, Figure 2 a&b . Fortunately, core–sheath fibers with more attractive merits including controllable mechanical strength, and better thermal and electrical conductivities can be produced using an innovative extension of co-axial electrospinning setup, Figure 2c .[21-25]

Another example has been illustrated by the synthesis of magnetic polyurethane nanocomposites with high loading of Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Brittle and cracked nanocomposites with larger clusters with agglomerated nanoparticles wrapped with a continuous polymer matrix were produced using conventional direct mixing (DM) method, Figure 3a .[26] In contrast, flexible nanocoomposites with uniformly distributed nanoparticles were obtained using surface-initiated-polymerization (SIP) method, Figure 3b . The elongation of the SIP nanocomposite is about four times greater than that of the DM composite in the tensile test, which renders possible coating industrial applications in the areas of electromagnetic wave absorbers and communication systems for the former.

On the other hand, the nano-chemical engineering and nanoprocesses can be affected by the design and engineered nanocomposites. By adding iron into the epoxy matrix, a lower curing temperature was obtained indicated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study, as illustrated in Figure 4 .[27]

Acknowledgement

The project is financially supported by National Science Foundation (NSF CMMI 10-30755 and CMMI 13-14486) USA.

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Figures at a glance
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